Remains of the Day

Remains of the Day was made for Hanging by A Thread, WAFTA’s Member exhibition held at Holmes a Court Gallery, 10 Douglas Street, West Perth 17 September – 2 October 2020.

Artist Statement:

We can never truly throw things away. They remain, maybe not in our homes, but somewhere on the earth.

I use recycled and repurposed textiles in the majority of my work, to honour the past work of others, for the narrative of the fabric, and attempting to reduce the environmental impact of my practice. Despite this, I still end up with left-over bits…mostly too small to use.

Whatever I create, creates waste, destined for the bin, to end up in landfill, probably not decomposing for many, many years.

What is left at the end of the day in the studio? This work is made from those scraps of fabric that remain.

Yet I still threw out a handful of dust and scraps…

DIMENSIONS: Total – 105cm high x 151cm wide

Three panels 97.5cm h x 66cm w, 84cm h x 64cm w, 105cm h x 68cm w

MATERIALS: Fabric scraps from previous work in the artist’s studio, polyester thread

Plans ahead

I’ve just looked back at the last post I wrote over a month ago. My studio is not the lovely clear space it was post clear out, as soon as I start to work things get a bit messy, the difference is – it is organized AND I can find things!

It has started to get busy. After all the cancellations in March, this second half of the year is getting exciting with work in exhibitions in September, November and December. (Fingers and toes crossed of course) There are also plans in place for 2021 and beyond ????

The first of these is WAFTA’s member’s exhibition Hanging by a Thread, due to open 17 September at Holmes a Court Gallery @ no.10. With over 100 artists represented, it will showcase the diversity of textile art practices in Western Australia. These are some detail shots of one my entries.

Stitched and Bound 2019

I am delighted to have my work A Merry Dance selected for Stitched and Bound 2019, which opens at Zig Zag Gallery, Kalamunda, 11 October and runs to 27 October 2019. The exhibition then tours to Lake Grace Regional Art Space 11 – 24 November 2019.

A Merry Dance is the second in a series on Domestic Maps. The work comprises layers of business shirts, dyed tea towels, woollen blanket, all retired from their original purpose in our household.  The layers have been machine stitched together with some areas cut away to reveal the under layers. The work is completed with hand stitched colonial knots. 

Artist Statement

A Vegetarian, a meat gourmand and one who loves tinned spaghetti, my children all cook, often at the same time. A merry dance around each other as they wear a path from fridge to stove top to sink. I’m very proud they can all cook, but “Oh what a mess!”

Exhibition Season

Sitting in a small hexagonal space in the Art Gallery of WA, Eveline Kotai asked us to breathe…and to observe. I had the pleasure of spending the next 50 minutes as she spoke, looking at her artwork that encompassed the walls behind her. The more I looked, the more I saw, the more I felt.Eveline’s work has always had the effect on me that people often talk about when first seeing an original Rothko. It gives me a sense of calm, but full of emotion, hard to describe and quite overwhelming.

She started her artist talk by commenting on the quote at the entrance to the exhibition. That we now spend more time reading the didactic than viewing the work, then often after only a few seconds of our attention we move onto the next work.It’s a really hard thing to do, to sit and simply look. So many distractions; the time allocated to the visit, the people you visit with, your initial attraction to the work…

She talked about how you really need to live with artwork to truly appreciate and understand it. I know of all the artwork I have purchased over the years; the initial attraction has grown this way and there is never a buyer regret as you sometimes have with other purchases.

Breathing Pattern at AGAW is on until Feb 2020.

One work that took my attention at Ruth Halbert and Jane Ziemon’s exhibition Fragmented Memories at Spectrum Project Space at the opening on Friday night is Ruth’s piece In Memoriam.Made from a beautiful piece of wool bought in Scotland for her aunt. The gift was too precious, and her aunt never used it. She gave it to Ruth on her Uni graduation, with the addition of moth holes along the folds. Plant dyed and stitched, this work deserves a longer look.Fragmented Memories is on show until 26 September 2019.

I LOVE Mikaela Castledine’s work in Immortal Stories at Linton and Kay Galleries Subiaco. Whimsical and poignant. The works are delightful. Attending the artist talk and discovering the stories behind each of these works only adds to my appreciation. Stories of her own childhood (that many of us will relate to) and precious stories shared by others are now not lost.Artist talks not only give you an insight to the work, but also an insight to the artist, their ways of working and their thoughts and views on how to live a creative life. To me this is gold!

Immortal Stories is on until 23 September.

 

Starting Over

I was tracking well on my latest piece of work. 2/3 finished and way ahead of the deadline…
Usually work slowly comes together, there is a love/hate relationship at various stages, with corrections and changes as the work develops.
The image in my head simply didn’t translate…the colours, the proportion, the contrast. There was simply no way to fix it.
So I have started over. Having made the decision it is actually quite a relief! I am much happier with the progress.
Below – A new start
Below- The top layer ready to machine stitch
Below – The Middle Layer
Each work I make stimulates more ideas to play and experiment with on the next piece. The more I make, the more I refine the process too. I have been experimenting with a range of backings over the years. Starting with polyester felt, upholstery fabrics and this year recycled denim. The denim made a lovely sturdy work, but proved difficult to hand stitch through. I’ve started doing a lot of hand stitching and the strength required to pull the needle through on each stitch really made my hands ache. I have changed to using old blankets for the last few pieces and find it much more comfortable on my hands.
Below – The backing. My childhood blanket recycled…again!
The backing for this new work was unpicked and sewn back together from a previous dud artwork. The disaster piece was no different. Both proving what not to do!
Since then there’s been a lot of machine stitching, cutting away areas
and lots of hand stitching Colonial KnotsAs I’ve been stitching away, I’ve been listening to more 99% Invisible podcasts – Here is their recent set on clothing. My favourites being Punk and Blue Jeans and Pockets.

A Well Worn Path

As a female artist, the role of caring for loved ones, domestic duties and family responsibilities are never far away. From nappies to the beginnings of an empty nest, twenty five years of laundry care are marked by a well worn path. Mostly invisible, yet expected, quiet steps throughout the house are often only noticed in their absence. Stitched layers of worn-out family clothing map the labouring process expected of so many women throughout our society.
A Well Worn Path is currently on show at the Minnawarra Art Awards, Armadale District Hall until 19 May 2019. The piece is made from family clothing, well washed and worn out: My Husband’s shirts printed with metallic paints, layered with shirts, shorts, jeans and silks. The whole piece is then machine stitched. Some areas have been cut away through two layers, then colonial knots cover the remaining circles to create the texture and contrast of the well worn layers.

Slow Textiles

Working is textiles is a rather slow process. I started this piece in mid February. It is large – 3 x 2m lengths and there are several very time consuming steps…lots of ironing, printing, machine stitching, cutting away and now covering the entire piece with colonial knots.The slow stitching is quite calming, I’ve got into a gentle working rhythm that is surprisingly easy on my back, neck and shoulders. Often the repetitive nature of my work leads to lots of pain…and always in the back of my mind – How will I complete this if my body can’t cope?I’ve started listening to Podcasts as I stitch. Thanks to a recommendation from my son, I’ve been listening become slightly addicted to 99% Invisible. I’m boring my poor husband with lots of interesting facts…

A lovely coincidence was to discover my recent favourite read, The Secret Lives of Colour by Kassia St Clair was a featured episode. I loved this book and her next, The Golden Thread– how fabric changed history. The chapter on spider’s silk lead me to google this amazing cape.

More stitching and Podcasts await!

New Year, New Work

While this is probably something I say every year, this year the approach is a little different.

Moving away from the “mosaic style” of my cut-away pieces, where I stitch 100s of 1-1 1/2 inch squares to a canvas, I’m trialing whole cloth pieces. I started this in “Days Like This”. These 20 x 20cm works were delightful to make and gave me the opportunity to include some simple hand stitch; colonial knots and running stitch. The challenge of course is the design/layout has to be determined before you start any machine stitching. With the “mosaic style” I could play around with the layout on the canvas until the very last stage of making the work. However there was a huge amount of time spend edging each small square with satin stitch.In this new work I have pushed the size to over 50 x 100cm. A challenge to manoeuvre for free motion stitching on the sewing machine, and awkward for access to the centre for hand stitching. Below – back of the work. Most seasoned quilters will say I am a being a wuss “that’s not very big!” BUT, I don’t have a long-arm quilting machine nor a quilting frame and in hindsight the backing of denim may have been a mistake. It’s quite tough to hand stitch through.

I’ve also worked mostly white on white, a shift from the usually bright colourful works I make in the cut-away technique. I’ve technically learnt a lot making this piece and during the time spent stitching, I now have lots way too many of ideas for “whole cloth” works!

Of Our Time – Ordinary Lives

Saturday night was a beautiful spring evening, the perfect weather for an exhibition opening.

A large crowd came to Midland Junction Arts Centre to see the opening of three exhibitions: Lost Soles by Claire Davenhall, Worn Out Worn Art (WOWA) 2018 exhibition and parade and my solo, Of Our Time – Ordinary LivesAfter a year working by myself in the studio to create this body of work it was an absolute delight to have so many friends, family, and fellow art lovers help me celebrate its opening to the public.

Making a body of work is only one step to exhibiting your work. Midland Junction Arts Centre staff have been wonderful to work with. Ease and grace come to mind. Curator Greg Sikich and volunteer Assistant Curator Lisa made me truely admire the skills of a curator. Achieving the vision I had with some works and guiding me with suggestions and decisions when I was less certain…I learnt a lot in those two install days.
A huge thank you also to Margaret Ford for her speech to open my exhibition. She immediately understood my work and portrayed it beautifully to the audience.Of course this body of work would not exist without the support and trust of my mother as you will see in the catalogue essay below. She willingly told me her very personal stories and those of her mother, my Nanna, in the knowledge that I was going to, in some form, interpret this into contemporary textiles. My one hope is that she feels I have honoured them. The ever supporting family 🙂 

Catalogue Esay

Of Our Time – Ordinary Lives explores the lives of three generations of maternal women in my family.

Family stories, those incidental ones beyond the dates of significant events, are lost if not recorded. Historical events and dates of births, deaths and marriages are easy to research. However how these same events personally affected my family as they navigated changing and challenging times can only be found through inquiry.

My early experience learning about the women in my family was through the naive lens of a child. My childhood memories of my Nanna’s life paint her days as simple and leisurely. My Mother appeared to cram a much larger workload into a strict timetable between home duties, work and study. By comparison, my own feels mashed together with few clear boundaries and little structure, but for the constant putting out of spot fires. My daughter’s life I can only project.

As a mature adult I started asking the right questions and discovered that the stories of my Mother and Nanna were much more complicated than I had believed. I have been fortunate to have access to old family letters: some nearly eighty years old, to records, memorabilia and photos. I have also been fortunate to have access to my mother, between heartfelt conversations and a shared visit to the Midland area much in the style of Julia Zemiro’s Home Delivery.

Often we can’t think of the right questions, or aren’t interested until it is too late, and as I observed this in my friends and family, I was determined not to let the intricacies of my own family history slip away.

My left-handed Nanna, who taught me how to crochet right-handed, was the eldest daughter in a large family, and long considered a confirmed spinster. As far as we know she never had paid employment outside of the home. In 1941, at 37 years of age she received a marriage proposal by letter and travelled from Melbourne, Victoria to the Midland Junction Train Station to meet her Husband to be: a man she had only met on a couple of occasions. With whom she would start a new life in Western Australia.

I was drawn to the precious items my mother has kept: Nan’s letters, including the proposal by my grandfather; her exquisite hand embroidered and crocheted doilies; telegrams, ration cards, and receipts for major purchases; the documents relating to my Grandfather’s early death; immunisation records; swimming certificates; five books in the Anne of Green Gables series. I began to get a sense of her experiences leaving a loving family in suburban Melbourne, a few tram stops from the city, to living through Perth summers near Midland, during WWll and the rationing of most living necessities. The only means of communication being via letters and the occasional telegram.

During my Nanna’s time, concepts of recycling and zero-waste were of necessity. This exhibition was created entirely from materials I already possessed: scraps from previous projects, recycled and gifted vintage fabrics, older Op Shop finds. 

2000 Miles Away uses tie linings complete with stains from washing, marks from manufacture and the remains of unpicked stitches, sewn together with recycled envelopes and overhead projector sheets. On a recreation of my Nanna’s hexagonal tiled floor their conversations are blurred by distance and time.

In 1962 my nineteen-year-old mother married my father and had to resign from her clerical job at the Government Railways in Perth, Western Australia. The “Marriage Bar” was still four years from its eventual repeal, requiring married women to give up their jobs in the Australian Public Service.

She found employment in a private company until I was born two years later.  As time went by she worked in many clerical roles and in her 40s followed her true passion, gaining a degree in Literature and History from UWA aged 50.

My mother’s life has been marked by massive shifts in the means of communication, along with the frequency and also the access across remote distances, thanks to developments in technology.

The typewriter in its many forms has been a pivotal part of her life. Starting with the “clunky old Remington with round black keys,” on which she learnt to type in High School, to a bright red Olivetti Valentine portable: I remember her squeals of delight in receiving it for her birthday from my father, and when she came home perplexed, having had to take a speed test on “one of these new Golf Ball Typewriters,” during a job interview. As technology has changed, her progression has continued with electric typewriters, computers, iPads and mobile phone texting.

The individual typewriter keys, unique and separate, when linked together have been the means to tell stories, write essays, apply for jobs, write letters to family and friends, and more recently, send emails and texts.

The title Remington Keys is taken from the typewriter brand she learnt to type on in high school. These keys show the structure of life, bound by society’s conventions, order, and acceptance of those rules imposed upon women. My mother worked within this framework in acceptance of these societal expectations and employed these skills to create the space to explore her dreams. The work employs vintage fabrics and op shop ties in the hues with which my mother would decorate her home across the decades and the fashions she followed.

Keyboards are now less a skill in and of themselves but a means so many of us use to communicate, shop, write our thoughts, and play. Textiles have changed in a similar way: they are no less present in our lives, but our relationship has changed. The traditional sewing, knitting, crocheting and embroidery skills passed down from my grandmother to my mother as important tools to make a home, have become a means of expression and exploration, when passed down to me.

Made from minute scraps leftover from my previous works, Days contains a timeline and travels of my own art practice. The approximately 20 000 squares, recreate the days of my life so far. As a group, they all blend together, similar though unique, frayed, complex, simple, broken, amazing and any other combination on any given day. Held on by a thread. A life and a day can go from happiness to sorrow and back.

These individual days are shown in their complexity, detail and contrasts when scaled-up in Days Like This. Minute details which are glossed over in the context of the whole, make up the subject matter of these individual works. 

 

I’m Finished!

The past few weeks has been all about the finishing details of the work for my exhibition.
Buttons seemed like a very appropriate way to finish these pieces. Who doesn’t have a button tin? I loved digging through Mum’s button tin as a child, and still did as I searched for the right button for each piece. So many of these buttons have a memory to me…Spare buttons from hand made cardigans, dresses and jackets, precious buttons removed to be recycled before a garment was thrown out. My own button tin, it’s like carbon dating my wardrobe and the clothes I made for my young children.
Below – I’ve used leftover vintage fabric scraps for the backings of these canvases.
Off cuts from the framing of these works hints at what might be on the other side… 
Backings, labels and hooks have been stitched into place.
All the work was photographed last Friday 
After that, I treated myself to some lovely fabrics from Woven Stories Textiles
Now I have a blank design wall  – ready for Catalogue preparation and lots of writing!