Spring

Spring has arrived. Colour is everywhere. Lovely longer, warmer days – well mostly.Spring 5I have spent the last couple of weeks taking things a little slower than normal to recover from a cold. The squares needed to be cut into circles, so over this time I have slowly cut all this. I have very blunt scissors and a few callouses on my fingers, and I am much happier with the result.Spring 1Too good to throw away, I will keep it for…someday. Spring 3Spring 4The 3 full sets of these circles now have to be put aside for other projects.Spring 8Spring 7

Fibreswest is only a couple of weeks away and I have a lot of textile admin to complete by then. Posting of work, preparing works for a sale table, updating bio data…

I visited a lovely exhibition of 40 x 40cm art quilts at Wanneroo Gallery, Australia Wide 4 presented by Oz Quilt Network. You can see them online at Australia Wide 4 or at one of the many galleries around Australia the exhibition is traveling to.

So Unexpected fashion parade of beautiful naturally dyed garments by Trudi Pollard and eco garments by Charlene O’Brien was a delight to attend on Saturday evening.

WAFTA’s guest speaker this month was Paula Hart. She gave an overview of her community art projects and an in-depth look at the processes for the stunning Lace fence project for West Leederville Primary School, from students drawings, to design, to installation. Cyclone fencing is made using the sprang technique. How the lace work sections are incorporated into this without the fencing coming apart was a great topic of conversation.

I am very pleased to have my work Silver Linings selected for Art Quilt Australia 2015 to be held in Geelong Oct – Dec.

Sprang, Gathering and Patterns

I’ve had an exciting and busy few days.

I went to the WAFTA work day on friday with the intention of learning how to Sprang. I first heard of this ancient weaving technique  from Mikaela Castledine when I attended a WAFTA visit to her studio a few weeks ago. She had a gorgeous wrap made in this technique and very generously gave me a quick demo.  On friday with the help of Anne Williams and a book she found on ancient Peruvian textiles we started to play.

Only warp threads are used

Only warp threads are used

I used strips of T -Shirting and working from the centre of the frame made a twist in the threads.  These are held in place with a ruler or knitting needle. The weaving develops at both ends at the same time.

The completed piece still under tension on the frame

The completed piece still under tension on the frame

This technique has been used for hair nets, hammocks and cyclone wire fencing.

The final sample off the frame.

The final sample off the frame.

Of course it was not this simple, lots of head scratching, false starts and unpicking and most of a day involved!

It is an interesting technique that I would like to explore further…

Yesterday was the third session of the Draping course at ECU. Our tutor has been encouraging us to consider the silhouette, change the shape of the body.   I decided to try making some of the clam shell shapes from thick felt to add some structure to the garment.

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I’ve covered the shapes with the same gathered fabric. Still more to do to become a wearable garment…

photo4photo7Today we went to the Midland Workshops Heritage open day. My mother worked in the office, both my Grandfathers, a Great Grandfather, great Uncles along with many other family members spent their working lives at these workshops. There is a memorial wall near the entrance with bricks dedicated to the workers and their trades. image

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It was very interesting to see the site of the workshops, and also the current use by artists. I am fascinated by the patterns, the components of the trains made in wood to be cast in metal. They have now become stunning sculptures as you can see in Eva Fernandez‘s work and souvenirs that I couldn’t resist.

Eva Fernandez's work at Midland Atelier

Eva Fernandez’s work at Midland Atelier

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What part of a train could these possibly be?